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SF Student Achievement Continues to Grow

Press Release

Achievement gap narrows for third consecutive year

August 15, 2011 (San Francisco) – San Francisco’s standardized test scores have improved in both English Language Arts (ELA) and Math tests.  This continues an upward trend for SFUSD, which in the past six years has seen proficiency rates in ELA improve by 9.9 percent and Math (Grades 2-7) by 9.4 percent.

This year the district scores increased in both ELA (1.1 percent) and Math (.8 percent).  More than half (57.4 percent) of the district’s students are now ‘proficient or above’ in ELA, and approximately two-thirds (66 percent) of them are ‘proficient or above’ in Math (Grades 2-7).

The percent of students proficient in SFUSD is higher than the state at all grade levels in both content areas except 4th grade where the state is 71 percent and the district is 70 percent proficient or advanced.

For the third year in a row, the district has narrowed the achievement gap, which means that the rate of growth for subgroups was higher than the district growth as a whole. In 2011, the growth in Math proficiency rates for Latinos was 2.2 percent. In ELA, the performance growth rate of African Americans was 2.7 percent. Also, for the third year in a row, the growth in proficiency rates for Samoans, a historically underserved group, was higher than the district in both content areas (ELA 3.2 and Math 2.6 percent).

“Our student achievement is moving in the right direction, with almost double-digit growth in performance over the past six years,” said Superintendent Carlos Garcia. “We made closing the achievement gap our top priority, and for the past three years the gap is narrowing.  We have a long way to go but these results are evidence that our strategic improvement efforts are paying off.”

“I am proud of the hard work of our students, teachers, parents and school administrators and their commitment to making San Francisco public schools the best in the nation,” said Mayor Ed Lee. “Our City has been in lock-step with the school district’s strategic priorities and we have aligned our funds and services to meet the needs of our students and their families. Our partnership grows stronger every year and we look forward to continuing our support to ensure that all of our students are successful academically and prepared for the 21st century economy.”

Gains in Algebra Participation, Science and Social Studies Proficiency

In order to be prepared for high school and college, the district wants all 8th grade students to take Algebra I. The percentage of Grade 8 students taking the CST Algebra I test or a higher level Math test has increased from 62 percent in 2007 to 86 percent in 2011. More than half the students (51.6 percent) scored proficient and above in CST Algebra I or higher tests.

For the past two years SFUSD has more than sixty percent of all students performing at proficient or advanced in Science. Sixty-three percent (63.2 %) of fifth graders were proficient and 61.6 percent of eighth grade students.

Similarly, in Social Studies over half of students scored proficient or advanced with a performance gain of 1.3 percent for 8th grade students and 4.2 percent for 11th graders compared to 2010 results.

School Level Successes

There were 17 elementary and K-8 schools with 75 percent or more students scoring at proficient or above in English Language Arts. There are five middle schools with more than two thirds of the students scoring at proficient or above in English Language Arts. At the high school level, there are seven schools where more than half of the students tested scored at proficient or above in English Language Arts. The schools are listed in the Table 1 below.

There were 18 elementary and K-8 schools with over 80 percent or more students scoring at proficient or above in Math. There are three middle schools with two-thirds or more of the students scoring at proficient or above in Math. At the high school level, there are five schools where one third or more of the students tested scored at proficient or above in Math. The schools are listed in the Table 2 below.

 

TABLE 1

CST –ELA Highest Performance

 

School

% Prof

 

Elem K-8

1

Alice Fong Yu

87%

 

2

Clarendon

87%

 

3

Chinese Immersion

87%

 

4

Sherman

86%

 

5

Stevenson

84%

 

6

John Yehall Chin

83%

 

7

Ulloa

83%

 

8

Lilienthal

81%

 

9

Peabody

81%

 

10

Feinstein

79%

 

11

Lafayette

79%

 

12

Sunset

79%

 

13

Lawton

78%

 

14

Grattan

78%

 

15

West Portal

77%

 

16

Miraloma

75%

 

17

Rooftop

75%

 

Middle

1

Giannini

78%

 

2

Presidio

74%

 

3

Roosevelt

70%

 

4

Hoover

68%

 

5

Aptos

67%

 

High

1

Lowell

95%

 

2

SOTA

81%

 

3

Balboa

60%

 

4

Washington

58%

 

5

Wallenberg

58%

 

6

Gateway

55%

 

7

Galileo

54%

 

 

TABLE 2

CST –Math (Combined) Highest Performance

 

School

% Prof

 

Elem K-8

1

John Yehall Chin

95%

 

2

Alice Fong Yu

93%

 

3

Ulloa

92%

 

4

Chinese Immersion

91%

 

5

Sherman

91%

 

6

Stevenson

90%

 

7

Clarendon

88%

 

8

Lawton

86%

 

9

Yick Wo

85%

 

10

Sunset

85%

 

11

West Portal

84%

 

12

Peabody

84%

 

13

Lafayette

84%

 

14

Jefferson

83%

 

15

Feinstein

83%

 

16

Argonne

82%

 

17

E.R.Taylor

82%

 

18

Alamo

81%

 

Middle

1

Giannini

75%

 

2

Presidio

73%

 

3

Roosevelt

66%

 

High

1

Lowell

81%

 

2

Galileo

48%

 

3

Lincoln

39%

 

4

Balboa

38%

 

5

Washington

37%

 

 

School Level Growth – Double-digit Growth:

Table 3 shows schools that achieved double-digit growth (>10% improvement in proficiency rates) in either ELA or Math.

 

TABLE 3

ELA Double-Digit Growth

Math Double-Digit Growth

 

School

 Growth

 

 

School

Growth

1

Starr King

20%

 

1

Junipero Serra

13%

2

John Yehall Chin

13%

 

2

KIPP SF Bay

12%

3

John Muir

13%

 

3

Horace Mann

11%

4

Rosa Parks

12%

 

4

New Traditions

11%

5

Feinstein

10%

 

5

William Cobb

11%

School Level Growth – Closing the Achievement Gap:

Table 4 shows schools that closed the achievement gap in both ELA and Math for either African Americans or Latinos. (In the schools listed, African-American and/or Latino students comprise at least 15 percent of enrollment, have a minimum enrollment of 20 students, and show a change in proficiency that is greater than the overall school change and is also greater than 0.)

 

TABLE 4

 

Closed the Gap for African Americans

 

Closed the Gap for Latinos

1.  Flynn

1. Alvarado

2.  Bret Harte

2. Glen Park

3.  Rosa Parks

3. Guadalupe

4.  Paul Revere

4. Starr King

5.  Everett

5. F. McKinley

6.  M.L. King

6. H. Milk

 

7. Monroe

 

8. Junipero Serra

 

9. Sheridan

 

10.  Downtown

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Page updated on 08/16/11