11/03/15 Schools receive Impact and Innovation Awards

Schools receive Impact and Innovation Awards

Press Release

November 3, 2015 (San Francisco) - Eighteen SFUSD schools will be awarded with funding in recognition of their impact and innovation.

These awards, focused on fostering innovation, are funded by the Quality Teacher and Education Act (QTEA) passed by voters in 2008.  With QTEA, SFUSD is able to recognize impactful and innovative work taking place and provide funds to help schools further advance their efforts. Over 50 SFUSD schools applied for the award this year.

For the Innovation Award, schools were asked to identify a challenge at their site and then work with SFUSD’s Innovation Lab to engage in a design process in order to arrive at a sustainable solution for their school.  Ten schools participated in a boot camp, during which they framed their challenge for the year, and worked with a design coach.

For the Impact Award, schools were asked to present projects aligned to SFUSD’s Vision 2025 that had demonstrated an impact on students.

Winning schools were awarded funds to either begin or expand their work.

 

The Impact Awards (funds total $247,865)

Lawton K-8

SF Community

Tenderloin Community ES

Marshall ES

Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy

James Lick MS

Grattan ES

Presidio MS

 

The Innovation Awards (funds total $250,000)

Marshall ES

Buena Vista Horace Mann K8

Charles Drew ES

Everett MS

Leonard R. Flynn ES

Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy

John Muir ES

June Jordan School for Equity HS

Alamo ES

Downtown HS

 

For both awards, schools were required to bring together stakeholders from across their community to prepare their application. A seven-member panel composed of representatives of SFUSD, United Educators of San Francisco, United Administrators of San Francisco, and the QTEA Oversight Committee reviewed the applications based on a published rubric shared in advance with all applicants. During judging, names of school sites were removed to ensure as bias-free an evaluation as possible.

About QTEA

Passed by voters in 2008 with over 70% approval, this ballot measure secured funds to increase teacher salaries, provide technology to classrooms, increase teacher accountability and help foster innovation.

To see examples of recent award funding -- such as a redesigned space for English Language Learners -- call for details

 

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For both awards, schools were required to bring together stakeholders from across their community to prepare their application. A seven-member panel composed of representatives of SFUSD, United Educators of San Francisco, United Administrators of San Francisco, and the QTEA Oversight Committee reviewed the applications based on a published rubric shared in advance with all applicants. During judging, names of school sites were removed to ensure as bias-free an evaluation as possible.

 

About QTEA

Passed by voters in 2008 with over 70% approval, this ballot measure secured funds to increase teacher salaries, provide technology to classrooms, increase teacher accountability and help foster innovation.

 

To see examples of recent award funding -- such as a redesigned space for English Language Learners -- call for details

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Page updated on 11/03/15

This page was last updated on June 29, 2021