How Mentoring Works

How Mentoring Works

  • Mentoring is a structured, consistent, and purposeful one-to-one relationship between a young person and a caring adult.
  • Mentors serve as positive role models and encourage and motivate students to become their best.
  • Mentoring is not case management, therapy, or teaching.
  • Mentoring first focuses on relationships building to establish mutual trust, respect, and friendship. Once these building blocks are in place, mentoring can start to address specific goals and sensitive issues.
  • Mentors offer students a pathway to expand their life perspectives, overcome obstacles and build on their strengths to make positive choices and develop essential school and life skills.
  • Mentoring is a proven strategy to build resiliency and life skills. Students in consistent mentoring relationships have been shown to be:
    • less likely to begin using drugs or alcohol
    • less likely to engage in violence
    • more likely to attend school
    • more likely to have a positive attitude toward school (Public/Private Ventures Big Brothers Big Sisters Study, 1995)
    • more likely to be positive toward elders and toward helping others (Jakielek et al., 2002)

How the Mentoring For Success program works

  • This is a school-based program. Mentor pairs meet weekly on the school site for approximately one hour during the school year and also have contact during the summer.
  • A Mentor Program Coordinator at the school site manages all aspects of the program to support mentors and their student mentees.
  • Mentors engage in a variety of asset-building activities with students on school grounds.
  • The program considers the individual needs and culture of each student.
  • Group activities are held during the school year and in the summer months.
  • Students may be referred to the mentor program by school staff. Students are invited to participate and parent/guardian consent is required.