First Grade - Math

Overview

Mathematics*

    50 mins every day

    Counting & Daily Routines

    10 mins every day. May or may not be connected to the lesson

    Math Talk 

    10-15 mins, 3-5 days per week. May or may not be connected to the lesson

    Lesson

    20 mins every day

    Learning Stations

    10-20 mins, 3-5 days per week. May or may not be connected to the lesson

    *The components listed may be taught at different times of the day (i.e. Extend your Morning Meeting to include Counting and Daily routines in the form of daily calendar).   

    Priority Standards

    What students will know, what students will do, and what thinking skills students will develop to apply and transfer mathematical understandings that endure within the discipline, leverage deeper understandings, and/or support readiness for success at the next grade level.

    In first grade focus on these critical areas:

    Instruction: Signature Elements

    Below are signature elements of SFUSD Math instruction that students should experience regularly throughout First Grade as they develop as mathematicians.

    Materials

    Below are items you should have to support your students' Math instruction. If you are missing anything from the list, please first contact your site administrator or designated support. If they are unable to resolve the issue promptly, please contact your site’s liaison from the C&I Math Department.

     

    SFUSD Math Student Classwork and Homework booklets are centrally printed and provided by the SFUSD Math Department; the booklets are printed in English, Spanish and Chinese. Here are PDFs for 1st-Grade Student Pages 

    Manipulatives have been provided to each site and should remain with the classroom.  Here is a linked list  of manipulatives for each grade Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 5.

    Units

    Unit Design

    SFUSD units are designed around four tasks. These tasks offer all students opportunities to engage in meaningful and rigorous mathematics that allow for the development of the Standards for Mathematical Practice. These tasks give information about how students are learning the core concepts and skills of the unit.

    All tasks are used for formative assessment—gathering information about what students know and are able to do—but they are not tests. The Entry, Apprentice, and Expert Tasks allow for student collaboration and individual accountability without being graded based on an expectation of mastery. The Milestone Task can be used as an individual assessment for grading students.

    Curriculum
    1. Entry Task: What do you already know?
    2. Apprentice Task: What sense are you making of what you are learning?
    3. Expert Task: How can you apply what you have learned so far to a new situation?
    4. Milestone Task: Did you learn what was expected of you from this unit?

     

    Units 

    1st Grade Math Portal

    K-2 Combined Grade Portal 

      Unit Description   Orientation

    Unit 1.0: Introduction

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    The first week of school is focused on setting up the classroom culture for the year and developing routines that support the development of the Standards for Mathematical Practice. Teachers will get to know their students as the students get to know themselves as math learners.

    Unit 1.0 Orientation

    Unit 1.1: Ten as a Unit

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    All whole numbers can be composed and decomposed into specific whole number combinations. These combinations can be shown visually in a variety of ways and recorded with an equation. These combinations are commutative. The Make Ten strategy is a useful strategy for solving problems. Unit 1.1 Orientation

    Unit 1.2: Attributes of 2-Dimensional Shapes

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Two-dimensional shapes with or without curved surfaces can be described, classified, and analyzed by their attributes. Students determine which attributes define a shape, such as number of sides and vertices, and which attributes to not, such as color or size. Students may use informal language to describe these attributes. Unit 1.2 Orientation

    Unit 1.3: Addition within 20

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Different situations suggest different addition strategies such as counting on, thinking about doubles or making a ten. Different situations can result in the same sum. The expressions that represent situations with the same sum are equal. This relationship can be recorded with an equal sign. Unit 1.3 Orientation

    Unit 1.4: Subttraction within 20

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Different situations suggest different subtraction strategies such as counting back, think addition or decomposing to ten. Different situations can result in the same difference. The expressions that represent situations with the same difference are equal. This relationship can be recorded with an equal sign. Unit 1.4 Orientation

    Unit 1.5: Measuring Length and Time

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    New - Time

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Some attributes of objects are measurable and can be quantified by counting iterated units. Unit 1.5 Orientation

    Unit 1.6: Problems with Unknowns

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Addition and subtraction represent a relationship between quantities in a real world context. The context may represent an add to, take from, put together, take apart, or comparison situation which can be recorded symbolically with an equation. Any number in the relationship may be unknown. Unit 1.6 Orientation

    Unit 1.7: Attributes of 3-Dimensional Shapes

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Three-dimensional objects (solids) with or without curved surfaces can be described, classified, and analyzed by their attributes, including faces, edges, and vertices. Unit 1.7 Orientation

    Unit 1.8: Challenging Problems

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Addition and subtraction represent a relationship between quantities in a real world context. The context may be an add to, take from, put together, take apart, or comparison situation. Any number in the relationship may be unknown. This relationship can be recorded symbolically with an equation. Unit 1.8 Orientation

    Unit 1.9: Numbers Greater Than 20

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    The base ten numeration system is a scheme for recording numbers using the digits 0 through 9, groups of ten, and place value. For any number, the place of a digit tells how many ones, tens, hundreds, and so forth are represented by that digit. Unit 1.9 Orientation

    Unit 1.10: Organizing Data

    Priorities

    Slide Deck English/Spanish

    Organizing data can make it easier to collect and interpret. Unit 1.10 Orientation

    Unit 1.11: Picture Book Project

    Priorities

    Each number has a word and a symbol that corresponds to its quantity. Quantities can be sequenced and compared. The focus of this unit is on discovering the base ten pattern of the counting numbers. (10 days)  

     

    Lesson Structure and Core Math

    LAUNCH

    The Launch of a lesson or task is a brief hook that might relate to previous learning, establish an inquiry question, or connect to real-world situations or interests. It will also support students to understand what is being asked of them, which may include guidance on the use of materials such as manipulatives. 

    Key Questions

    How can you connect to students' interests/lives (hook)?
    How will you make sure all students have access and rigor?

    EXPLORE

    During the Explore part of a lesson or task, students carry the cognitive load. Students experiment together with the most important math of each unit to develop, deepen and secure their mathematical understanding. They represent their thinking with numbers, pictures, words, and visual representations such as ten frames or number lines. Students are talking throughout this part of the lesson, and building on each other’s ideas and questions. The Explore often includes a math game and/or centers.

    Key Questions

    What are students doing? What work do you want to highlight?

    What does their work show about what they understand?

    What language are the students using to describe their work?

    SUMMARIZE

    During the Summarize part of a lesson or task, the teacher facilitates a conversation where students share what they have learned related to the core math. They notice and name similarities, differences, or connections across several different pieces of math work. A summary often, but not always, includes routines for consolidation of learning, such as a gallery viewing or individual reflection in a notebook.

    Key Questions

    How will you sequence the work to elicit peer-to-peer academic discourse? 

    What questions or prompts might you use? 

    How will you connect different pieces of work to each other?

    How will you connect the work to the core math?

    Planning Guide

    Planning Calendar

    This calendar is intended as an instructional guide to help with year-long planning. There is no expectation that you teach a particular lesson on a particular day. Each unit is set within a “window” of time that gives you some flexibility.

    Reflection Questions

    1. How are students' developmental needs, communities, and experiences being reflected and honored, or how could they be?
    2. What opportunities do you see for developing equitable access & demand, inquiry, collaboration, and assessment for learning?
    3. What are the implications for your own practice? What strengths can you build upon? What will you do first?

    Want More?

    Standards

    More Resources

     

    Contact the Math Team:

    This page was last updated on May 18, 2023