2018-2019 Innovation Awards

This year the QTEA Innovation Awards supported 15 schools in tackling equity challenges important to their community. This year, schools were asked to align their work with the SFUSD Graduate Profile and develop the competencies of the profile in their design solutions. The caliber of this year’s presentations at pitch night was so overwhelmingly strong that the SOMELAND foundation closed the funding gap for all schools between what QTEA could fund and what they asked for. Every school got their Pitch Night Ask met.

Abraham Lincoln High School

At ALHS, being a school of 2100+ students, we have a troubling (infuriating) number of transfer and dropout rates amongst our 9th and 10th grade students of color.

Bret Harte Elementary School

What do we need to do differently so that our African American students transition from dependent to independent learners at the same rate as other students?

Buena Vista Horace Mann

How does gender identity impact the experience of our girls/non-binary students at BVHM?

County Community Schools

Creating programmatic options for high school students who would otherwise drop out and who do not identify college as their primary after high school goal.

Carver Elementary School 

To empower African American boys to be resilient in & dedicated to building literacy skills.

Francis Scott Key Elementary School 

Provide learning spaces and resources that are responsive to the needs of historically underserved students with learning, physical, and social emotional needs.

Herbert Hoover Middle School 

How might we design learning experiences and leverage 1:1 technology access to ensure all students have multiple ways to engage in learning and have voice & choice in demonstrating learning as part of a community of learners.

James Denman Middle School 

How might we design learning experiences and leverage 1:1 technology access to ensure all students have multiple ways to engage in learning and have voice & choice in demonstrating learning as part of a community of learners.

John McLaren Early Education School

How might we provide our youngest learners at John McLaren Early Education School with access to arts education?

Jose Ortega Elementary

How are we learning about and thinking about moving students from dependent learners to independent thinkers and learners? How might we understand and utilize cognitive routines to move, specifically our African American and English Language Learners, from dependent learners to independent thinkers?

Mission High School 

The equity dilemma we are focused on, and in fact is one of our key areas of growth that we have self-identified, is around the vision of African American, Latinx, and EL students coming together and engaging with each other joyfully as intellectuals

Roosevelt Middle School

How might we design learning experiences and leverage 1:1 technology access to ensure all students have multiple ways to engage in learning and have voice & choice in demonstrating learning as part of a community of learners.

Sheridan Elementary School

Teach and engage all stakeholders in digital literacy so they feel confident and competent as independent digital learners.

The Academy – SF @ McAteer

Our challenge lies in how we are supporting our African American students to feel connected to our school and how we are specifically and strategically supporting the development of a growth mindset.

Willie L Brown Jr Middle School

The health and wellness of our students is disproportionately impacted by their environment and it interferes with their academic success. We want our students to understand these local and regional environmental issues and be able to advocate for themselves and their community.