Tips for sharing videos

Sharing videos you made

Upload your videos to Google Drive

Google Drive iconUploading or saving a video to Google Drive is one of the easiest way to share videos with students. If you used a tool like Quicktime or your phone/tablet camera to record the video, you'll need to upload the video file to either the Google Drive website (drive.google.com) or use the Google Drive app. Don't forget to make sure you're logged into Google Drive with your SFUSD account! If you used Screencastify to record the video, the videos are automatically saved in your Google Drive already.

Share your videos from Google Drive

Google Slides iconThere are many ways to share videos that are stored in Drive. You can share a link to the video with viewers, after adjusting the sharing settings of the video in Drive to give the right people "View" access (not "Edit"). You can then share video links through Google Classroom, Seesaw, Clever, email, or ParentVUE.

You can also insert the video into a Google Slides deck, by clicking the "Insert" menu and then choosing "Video". A smaller window will open up, and one of the tabs in that window is "Google Drive".

Share your videos on YouTube

YouTube iconYouTube is a very comfortable space for many students and families to watch videos, but there are many downfalls to YouTube too. Students often get distracted and off-task, and SFUSD has turned on some YouTube filters that affect which videos students can access. In an effort to reduce the amount of non-academic content students were able to access on YouTube, SFUSD switched elementary and middle school students from "Moderate Restricted" to "Strict" filtering. High school students are still at "Moderate Restricted" filtering (no change), and staff still have unrestricted YouTube access (no change). However, this is a blanket filter run by YouTube, and, unfortunately, SFUSD does not currently have a way to customize (or know) what it blocks and what it doesn't.

So while categorizing your video as "education" when you upload it to your SFUSD YouTube account may let the video through YouTube’s filter, the only way to guarantee students will be able to watch a video you created is to keep it in Drive.

Using others' videos from YouTube

Why are some videos "restricted" for students?

Screenshot of restricted video error messageAs mentioned above, in an effort to reduce the amount of non-academic content students were able to access on YouTube, SFUSD switched elementary and middle school students from "Moderate Restricted" to "Strict" filtering. High school students are still at "Moderate Restricted" filtering (no change), and staff still have unrestricted YouTube access (no change). This is a blanket filter run by YouTube, and, unfortunately, unfortunately, SFUSD does not currently have a way to customize (or know) what it blocks and what it doesn't.

At this time, the only way to know if students will be able to watch a video from YouTube or is to have students try to access it. While inserting a video into a slide deck removes YouTube distractions such as comments and suggested videos, it does not bypass YouTube's filter. If students can't see the video on YouTube, they won't be able to watch it in a slide deck. Students on a district-managed Chromebook or iPad will also have more restrictions in YouTube than students on personal devices. Teachers could consider making the testing of video links a classroom job, where you have a student or two who "check" video links for you before distributing the link/video to the class (at least one tester should be on a district-managed Chromebook/iPad).

If a video you recorded yourself is getting caught by the filter, we recommend you share it through Google Drive.

Ways to share YouTube videos

Many wonderful and educational videos get caught by YouTube's filter, but it doesn't mean you can't use these videos with students.

EdPuzzle iconYou can put these videos into EdPuzzle (a district-approved tool) to allow students to watch them, but the neatest part about EdPuzzle is that you can use this tool to check for understanding as students watch the video! By inserting multiple choice and short answers questions for students to answer as the video plays (we recommend 1 question every 15-30 seconds), you can help students process the information and help them focus on the important information. In addition, if students don't know the answer to the question, EdPuzzle will even allow them to rewatch the segment of video starting right after the question before (and it tells teachers how many times a student rewatched that segment). It will auto-grade multiple choice questions for you, but even grading short answer questions is quick and easy. See a demonstration of how fast grading short answers can be.

Note: It's important to know that you can only have 20 videos in your Edpuzzle account at a time, but you can delete videos (student scores and data stay) to make space for new ones. EdPuzzle also can be integrated with Google Classroom, and there is a library of ready-to-go videos with questions that you can duplicate and use. Learn more about EdPuzzle at SFUSD.

Nearpod can also be used to share YouTube videos, but the owner of the video has to "allow playback on other sites" for the video to work in Nearpod. It's important to test the Nearpod activity yourself, using the code in an incognito window, to make sure the video will be accessible to students. Learn more about Nearpod at SFUSD.

Other resources

You can also check out our Tips for Using YouTube with Students resource.

Screenshot of resource